Teaching Personal Statement

The value of education has been apparent to me from a young age, coming from an academically inclined family, and I have seen the benefits that instilling a love of learning at a young age can bring to both individual and society. My teachers were crucial in shaping my outlook and personality as much as my intellect and I would relish the opportunity to play a similarly nurturing and inspiring role for others. While my academic studies have focused on text-based subjects, I have recently enjoyed applying my transferable study skills to learning the skills needed to play a positive role in the lives of those in need of education and care. I have completed an NVQ Level 1 in Supporting People with a Learning Disability and a Level 2 Diploma in Health and Social Care. These cover a range of planning, communication (including Makaton and Braille), legislative, and practical issues that may arise. In response to the last of these, I have also undertaken a range of practical training courses, including: Understanding and Working with Challenging Behaviour; Health and Safety and Fire Training; care and provision of medicine, Epilepsy Awareness and First Aid; and SOVA (Safeguarding of Young Adults).

This practical training has already proven extremely useful throughout my work experience in educational environments. At Greenford High School, I had the opportunity to work with 11-16 year olds, supporting them one-to-one during literature and reading activities. This was an excellent chance to witness the day-to-day activities of teaching and confirmed that it would not only be an excellent match for my skills and experience but also hugely rewarding. It was only when I began working with adults with both mild and profound learning difficulties, while working at Richmond College’s Support for Living course, that I realised my enthusiasm for working with challenging pupils and those at an earlier stage of education. I work with a range of Service Users, with mental ages ranging from 3-7 and multiple conditions including Downs Syndrome, Cerebral Palsy, and limited speech and language. I have enjoyed applying the skills that I have learnt through study, using open questions to engage students and avoid behavioural difficulties and finding new, innovative ways to interact with those at an early stage of their educational and personal development. I have particularly enjoyed learning about, and employing, Phoebe Cadwell’s Intensive Interaction approach; based on the ability to read the full communicative cues of a person, including all forms of verbal and non-verbal communication. I have regular meetings with my assessor to discuss and review both my performance and new ideas.

Outside of my work experience and study, my passion for education also impacts on my extra-curricular activities. I have fostered a strong relationship with a particular student from college, for example, and undertake additional lessons with her during holidays. I also enjoy reading up on developments in the field and new approaches to early years and SEN education in journal articles and other online sources. As a lover of literature myself, I am also particularly keen to instil this in the children in my life and enjoy spending time storytelling with my nieces and nephews.

I am aware that teaching is as challenging as it is rewarding and I have worked hard to gain the skills, knowledge and experience to rise to these challenges in the future. As a positive, outgoing person, with a profound love of children and respect for both the process and positive effects of education, I believe that I will continue to bring this natural aptitude to future studies; building on the foundation I have already created and achieving my ultimate goal to make a positive contribution to individual lives, and to society, through teaching.


Thinking of becoming a teacher? This Teaching personal statement sample will be a useful guide when writing your university application and personal statement.